Collecting Everyday Life

Lesson Plan 7: Collecting Biological Phenomena in Everyday Life

As a homework assignment, students will use their Mobile phones to take pictures and/or videos of biological organisms that they encounter on their everyday travels. They will send the pictures, along with a short description of what they think the photo shows, to a private media storage site at Flickr.com. Back in the classroom, they will place their pictures on a digital map that shows where they discovered the organisms, and then describe them.

OBJECTIVE

Students will…

●      explore and document their local biological habitats and the plants and animals that live in those habitats.

●      place images of the biological phenomena on a map in the location that they were discovered.

●      interpret the reasons why those particular plants and animals live in the habitat.

MATERIALS

Materials:

Mobile phone (basic or smart) with the capability to take pictures and videos

Computer with Web access (site accessed: flickr.com )

SET UP AND PREPARE

The teacher sets up one mobile Flickr e-mail account for all students to use with their Mobile phones. See the tour here.

•    Log in to flickr.com

•    Register for an account

•    In the account, click on Uploading Tools—Email

•    Copy the e-mail address onto a handout for the students

 

The teacher creates a directions sheet on how to send a picture from a Mobile phone to the mobile Flickr address. Directions should include the following steps:

1.    Add a New Contact

2.    Under New Contact, add a new e-mail as the Flickr email

3.    Take the picture with Mobile phone

4.    Click on Send

5.    Add your Flickr e-mail contact as the “Send to”

6.    On the Subject line, text a description of what you found and where you found it

7.    Click on Send

DIRECTIONS

  1. The teacher goes over mobile safety and appropriate use before beginning this lesson.
  2. Next, the teacher explains that students will use their Mobile phones to take pictures of animals and/or plants they find in different places around their local community. When students come across a plant or animal outside of the school yard, they will take out their Mobile phones, snap a picture of it, and send the picture to the mobile Flickr website. Along with the picture, they will send a short message describing where they found the phenomena and what they believe it may be (such as “a gum leaf found at Bay Harbor by the dock” or “a possum found in my backyard”).
  3. Back in the classroom, the teacher logs into the mobile Flickr account. Under Menu—Organize and Create—My Map, the teacher can create a map that will automatically appear when the account is accessed. The teacher asks each student to come up to the computer, click on his or her picture(s), and place their pictures on the Flickr map in the exact location where they discovered the phenomena.

 

 

Extensions:

•    Students who do not have their own Mobile phone can take pictures with a digital camera, upload the pictures to the computer, and send them to the Flickr site via e-mail (using the same e-mail as the Flickr mobile address).

 

•    If students have video capture on their Mobile phones, they can document their findings in a short video (describing what they believe the biological phenomena is and where it is located), and send the video to the mobile Flickr e-mail address.

 

•    Students can choose to focus solely on plants or on animals.

 

Hints and Tips:

•    The teacher should make sure students add the mobile Flickr e-mail address as a “new contact” in their phones before starting the project. This way, they will not lose the address and will have it with them at all times.

 

•    The teacher may want to ask students to text in their name (or an ID) when they send in their pictures and movies so that she will know who has completed the assignment.

 

•    Once the mobile Flickr address has been created, the teacher can use this address for future class projects throughout the year.

 

 

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